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In recent years, there has been a reduction in rates of teen pregnancy, births, and abortions. Similarly there has been a drop off in the share of adolescents engaging in sexual activity. Despite this shift, recent data indicate that the rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among teens and young adults remain higher in the U. than in other developed nations and are considerably higher among certain racial and ethnic minorities and in different geographic regions in the nation.

indeed the sites themselves are designed to encourage the sharing of information and the expansion of networks.However, few teens embrace a fully public approach to social media.Instead, they take an array of steps to restrict and prune their profiles, and their patterns of reputation management on social media vary greatly according to their gender and network size.These are among the key findings from a new report based on a survey of 802 teens that examines teens’ privacy management on social media sites: Teens are increasingly sharing personal information on social media sites, a trend that is likely driven by the evolution of the platforms teens use as well as changing norms around sharing.A typical teen’s My Space profile from 2006 was quite different in form and function from the 2006 version of Facebook as well as the Facebook profiles that have become a hallmark of teenage life today.

For the five different types of personal information that we measured in both 20, each is significantly more likely to be shared by teen social media users on the profile they use most often.Generally speaking, older teen social media users (ages 14-17), are more likely to share certain types of information on the profile they use most often when compared with younger teens (ages 12-13).Older teens who are social media users more frequently share: While boys and girls generally share personal information on social media profiles at the same rates, cell phone numbers are a key exception. Various differences between white and African-American social media-using teens are also significant, with the most notable being the lower likelihood that African-American teens will disclose their real names on a social media profile (95% of white social media-using teens do this vs. Beyond basic profile information, some teens choose to enable the automatic inclusion of location information when they post.Boys are significantly more likely to share their numbers than girls (26% vs. Some 16% of teen social media users said they set up their profile or account so that it automatically includes their location in posts.Boys and girls and teens of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds are equally likely to say that they have set up their profile to include their location when they post.Focus group data suggests that many teens find sharing their location unnecessary and unsafe, while others appreciate the opportunity to signal their location to friends and parents.